Intestinal microorganisms involved in colorectal cancer complicated with dyslipidosis

Han, SW; Pan, YF; Yang, X; Da, M; Wei, Q; Gao, YH; Qi, Q; Ru, LX

Ru, LX (reprint author), Huzhou Cent Hosp, Dept Intervent & Radiotherapy, 198 Hongqi Rd, Huzhou 313000, Zhejiang, Peoples R China.

CANCER BIOLOGY & THERAPY, 2019; 20 (1): 81

Abstract

Background: Abnormal lipid metabolism is considered to be one of main promoters of colorectal cancer (CRC), and intestinal microorganisms may be involved in CRC in patients with abnormal lipid metabolism. Objective: To investigate lipid metabolism in CRC patients and explore the role of intestinal microorganisms in CRC complicated with abnormal lipid metabolism. Methods: Overall, 150 CRC patients in Huzhou Central Hospital from January 2016 to September 2017 were recruited in the present study. Basic patient information and clinical serological indicators were investigated and analyzed. Twenty-one stool samples were collected from patients after receiving informed consent. Next-generation sequencing technology was used to sequence bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA. Bioinformatics analysis was used to profile the microbial composition and screen distinctive bacteria in patients with CRC complicated with abnormal lipid metabolism. Results: Apo B and FFA levels were higher in patients with stage I disease than in patients with other stages. HDL, LDL, Apo B and FFA levels were higher in female patients than in male patients. FFA level was higher in rectal cancer patients than in colon cancer patients. These differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The proportion of Escherichia/Shigella was increased in CRC patients with hyperlipoidaemia and hypercholesteremia; the abundance of Streptococcus was increased in CRC patients with hyperlipoidaemia; the abundance of Clostridium XIVa was reduced in CRC patients with hyperlipoidaemia and hypercholesteremia; and the abundance of Ruminococcaceae was reduced in CRC patients with hypercholesteremia. Bilophila and Butyricicoccus were closely related to CRC patients without hyperlipoidaemia or hypercholesteremia, and Selenomonas, Clostridium, Bacteroidetes Slackia, Burkholderiales and Veillonellaceae were closely related to CRC patients with hyperlipoidaemia. Some pathways, including secretion system, chaperones and folding catalysts, amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, histidine metabolism, pores and ion channels, nitrogen metabolism and sporulation, may be involved in lipid metabolism abnormality in CRC patients. Conclusions: Many CRC patients have abnormal lipid metabolism, and the intestinal microbiota is altered in these CRC patients.

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